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John Payne quotes passages from Galland's unpublished diary: recording Galland's encounter with a Syrian Maronite storyteller from Aleppo , Hanna Diyab. Galland's diary further reports that his transcription of "Aladdin" for publication occurred in the winter of — It was included in his volumes ix and x of the Nights , published in The other is supposed to be a copy Mikhail Sabbagh made of a manuscript written in Baghdad in As part of his work on the first critical edition of the Nights , Iraq 's Muhsin Mahdi has shown [6] that both these manuscripts are forgeries—"back-translations" of Galland's text into Arabic.

The story is often "re-told" with variations—the following is a precis of the Burton translation of Aladdin is an impoverished young ne'er-do-well, dwelling in "one of the cities of China". He is recruited by a sorcerer from the Maghreb , who passes himself off as the brother of Aladdin's late father, Mustapha the tailor , convincing Aladdin and his mother of his good will by pretending to set up the lad as a wealthy merchant.

The sorcerer's real motive is to persuade young Aladdin to retrieve a wonderful oil lamp from a booby-trapped magic cave. After the sorcerer attempts to double-cross him, Aladdin finds himself trapped in the cave.

Aladdin is still wearing a magic ring the sorcerer has lent him. When his mother tries to clean the lamp, so they can sell it to buy food for their supper, a second far more powerful genie appears who is bound to do the bidding of the person holding the lamp. With the aid of the genie of the lamp, Aladdin becomes rich and powerful and marries Princess Badroulbadour , the sultan 's daughter after magically foiling her marriage to the vizier 's son.

The genie builds Aladdin and his bride a wonderful palace, far more magnificent than the sultan's. The sorcerer hears of Aladdin's good fortune, and returns; he gets his hands on the lamp by tricking Aladdin's wife who is unaware of the lamp's importance by offering to exchange "new lamps for old".

Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp

He orders the genie of the lamp to take the palace, along with all its contents, to his home in the Maghreb. Aladdin still has the magic ring and is able to summon the lesser genie. The genie of the ring cannot directly undo any of the magic of the genie of the lamp, but he is able to transport Aladdin to the Maghreb where, with the help of the "woman's wiles" of the princess he recovers the lamp and slays the sorcerer, returning the palace to its proper place.

The sorcerer's more powerful and evil brother plots to destroy Aladdin for killing his brother by disguising himself as an old woman known for her healing powers. Badroulbadour falls for his disguise and commands the "woman" to stay in her palace in case of any illnesses. Aladdin is warned of this danger by the genie of the lamp and slays the imposter. Everyone lives happily ever after, Aladdin eventually succeeding to his father-in-law's throne.

The opening sentences of the story, in both the Galland and the Burton versions, set it in "one of the cities of China". For instance, the ruler is referred to as " Sultan " rather than being called the " Emperor ", as in some re-tellings, and the people in the story are Muslims and their conversation is larded with devout Muslim platitudes. A Jewish merchant buys Aladdin's wares and incidentally cheats him , but there is no mention of Buddhists or Confucians or other distinctively Chinese people.

Notably, ethnic groups in Chinese history have long included Muslim groups , including large populations of Uighurs , and the Hui people whose origins go back to Silk Road travelers. Islamic communities have been known to exist in the region since the Tang Dynasty. Some have suggested that the intended setting may be Turkestan encompassing Central Asia and the modern Chinese province of Xinjiang in Western China. For all this, speculation about a "real" Chinese setting depends on a knowledge of China that the teller of a folk tale as opposed to a geographic expert might well not possess.

Adaptations vary in their faithfulness to the original story. In particular, difficulties with the Chinese setting are sometimes resolved by giving the story a more typical Arabian Nights background. The traditional Aladdin pantomime is the source of the well-known pantomime character Widow Twankey Aladdin's mother.

In pantomime versions, changes in the setting and story are often made to fit it better into "China" albeit a China situated in the East End of London rather than Medieval Baghdad , and elements of other Arabian Nights tales in particular Ali Baba are often introduced into the plot. Aladdin still has the magic ring and is able to summon the lesser genie. The genie of the ring cannot directly undo any of the magic of the genie of the lamp, but he is able to transport Aladdin to the Maghreb where, with the help of the "woman's wiles" of the princess he recovers the lamp and slays the sorcerer, returning the palace to its proper place.

The sorcerer's more powerful and evil brother plots to destroy Aladdin for killing his brother by disguising himself as an old woman known for her healing powers. Badroulbadour falls for his disguise and commands the "woman" to stay in her palace in case of any illnesses. Aladdin is warned of this danger by the genie of the lamp and slays the imposter.

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Everyone lives happily ever after, Aladdin eventually succeeding to his father-in-law's throne. The opening sentences of the story, in both the Galland and the Burton versions, set it in "one of the cities of China". For instance, the ruler is referred to as " Sultan " rather than being called the " Emperor ", as in some re-tellings, and the people in the story are Muslims and their conversation is larded with devout Muslim platitudes.

Aladdin And The Enchanted Lamp with Subtitles - Chapter 1

A Jewish merchant buys Aladdin's wares and incidentally cheats him , but there is no mention of Buddhists or Confucians or other distinctively Han Chinese people. Notably, ethnic groups in Chinese history have long included Muslim groups , including large populations of Uighurs , and the Hui people whose origins go back to Silk Road travelers. Islamic communities have been known to exist in the region since the Tang Dynasty. Some have suggested that the intended setting may be Turkestan encompassing Central Asia and the modern Chinese province of Xinjiang in Western China. For all this, speculation about a "real" Chinese setting depends on a knowledge of China that the teller of a folk tale as opposed to a geographic expert might well not possess.

Adaptations vary in their faithfulness to the original story. In particular, difficulties with the Chinese setting are sometimes resolved by giving the story a more typical Arabian Nights background. The traditional Aladdin pantomime is the source of the well-known pantomime character Widow Twankey Aladdin's mother. In pantomime versions, changes in the setting and story are often made to fit it better into "China" albeit a China situated in the East End of London rather than Medieval Baghdad , and elements of other Arabian Nights tales in particular Ali Baba are often introduced into the plot.

One version of the "pantomime Aladdin" is Sandy Wilson 's musical Aladdin , from Since the early s Aladdin pantomimes have tended to be influenced by the Disney animation. The Sorcerer tricks a handmaiden and offers "new lamps for old lamps". From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Middle Eastern folk tale.

This article is about the original folk tale. For other uses, see Aladdin disambiguation and Aladdin name.

For other uses, see Magic lantern disambiguation. Play media. Aladdin: A New Translation. Liveright Publishing. Retrieved 23 May Archived from the original on 5 February Retrieved Sondheim Guide.

Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp: Large Print - John Payne - Google книги

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